Looking at the music of Dutch rock band Focus, started in the late sixties by Thijs Van Leer (b /31/03/48) with Jan Akkerman (b 24/12/46). Van Leer still performs and records under the name today (official site here). Akkerman's site here.

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20071203

Track by track 13 Moving Waves

Archive number: 13
Title: Moving WavesMain Album: Moving Waves (Focus 2 in Holland)
Track number: 4
Genre: Classical (Piano and voice)
Studio: Sound Techniques Studio, 46a Old Church Street, Chelsea, London SW3
Length: 2' 36"
Composer: Thijs van Leer
Musicians: Thijs van Leer – Grand Piano, Vocal
Producer: Mike Vernon
Engineer: Jerry Boys
Label: LP - Imperial, Blue Horizon CD – EMI Bovema, IRS, Red Bullet
Date of recording/release: April 13 - May 14 1971/October 1971. CD - 1988, 1993, 2001
Alternative versions: There is a live version on the van Leer album Trading Boundaries
Notes: A very unusual track for a rock album, this piece is a setting of the words of the Muslim Sufi mystic, Inayat Khan, a big influence on his mother Mary. Van Leer wrote the piece when he was 16 (probably as a composition exercise) and only he features, singing to his own accompaniment on piano. Following a piano introduction (00:00-00:35) the vocal begins. The swirling sounds of the piano perfectly reflect the words at every point, climaxing with the caesura or pause (02:21) just before the crucial final line and a subsiding like the waves themselves. The words are
 
Moving waves, the wind has left you
And you are still in commotion?
Moving waves, the wind has left you
And you are still in commotion?

We are still repeating the word it has taught us.
It moves our whole being to ecstasy.

Waves, why do you all become excited
And then all calm together?
Because behind our individual action
There is one impulse working.
Because behind our individual action
There is one impulse working.

Rising waves ... what motive is behind your impulse?
What motive is behind your impulse?

The desire to reach upwards!

Note on Inayat Khan (from Wikipedia)
Hazrat Inayat Khan (July 5 1882 – February 5 1927) was the founder of Universal Sufism and the Sufi Order International. He initially came to the West as a representative of several traditions of classical Indian music, having received the title Tansen from the Nizam of Hyderabad. However, Khan felt his life mission was to be to introduce and transmit Sufi thought and practice to the West. His universal message of Divine Unity – Tawhid – focused on the themes of "Love, Harmony and Beauty" and evinced a distinctive and often effective ability to transmit Sufism to Western audiences in his day.

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